Victor silvester and his ballroom orchestra - don't ask me why - waltz - in a shady nook - quickstep


He notes in his autobiography that his first two pianists in 1935 were Gerry Moore for the melody and Felix King for the "lemonade". Later pianists included, at different times, Monia Liter, Charlie Pude, Jack Phillips, Billy Munn, Victor Parker (also accordion), Ernest "Slim" Wilson (who was also Silvester's main arranger, and with whom he co-wrote several pieces), Eddie Macauley and Ronnie Taylor. Silvester's drummer for over four decades was Ben Edwards, crucial for supplying the strict tempo. Sometimes there might be four saxophones altogether, two alto and two tenor, including in latter years Tony Mozr, Percy Waterhouse and Phil Kirby in addition to Pogson, all doubling on clarinet as required. On some recordings, the Ballroom Orchestra was augmented with 15 strings and woodwind, when it became "The Silver Strings". During the war, when Oscar Grasso was in the forces, the classical violinist Alfredo Campoli took his place, using the name "Alfred Campbell" for contractual reasons. [8]

"Thank you for the info and advice. You could have snowed me into buying a replacement, instead, you told me the truth. It is much appreciated." -J.

Special Categories: Audio Book, computer-generated   Audio Book, human-read   Compilations   Data   Music, recorded   Music, Sheet   Other recordings   Pictures, moving   Pictures, still  

After the war, he returned to the traditional ballroom dance music that he preferred. Silvester wrote some 90 dance tunes in collaboration with his pianist, Ernest Wilson , but was well-known for his interpretations of the work of Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart , and had a marked preference for the musical standards of the 1930s, which he kept recording well into the 1970s and beyond. Apart from his one concession to swing music in the early '40s, as a sort of wartime sacrifice, he was oblivious to most of the changes in music that took place around him as the decades wore on, never even acknowledging rock & roll; such was the musical environment of the times, that he was one of EMI's prized artistic possessions during the 1950s. Silvester was awarded the Order of the British Empire, a royal honor, in 1961, and continued making records for another 15 years, finally embracing '60s and '70s melodies on albums such as Up Up and Away. He recorded so many hundreds of albums, that they became impossible even for the bandleader to keep track of, and EMI later issued his work on CD in the 1980s and 1990s, most recently Victor Silvester and His Silver Strings. As Silvester grew older, his son Victor Silvester Jr. frequently deputized for him leading the orchestra, and upon the older Silvester's death during a vacation in France in 1978, his son took over the orchestra.

Sylvester House, a portion of an undergraduate dormitory at Johns Hopkins University , is named in his honor. Several professorships there are named in his honor also.


Victor Silvester and His Ballroom Orchestra - Don't Ask Me Why - Waltz - In A Shady Nook - QuickstepVictor Silvester and His Ballroom Orchestra - Don't Ask Me Why - Waltz - In A Shady Nook - QuickstepVictor Silvester and His Ballroom Orchestra - Don't Ask Me Why - Waltz - In A Shady Nook - QuickstepVictor Silvester and His Ballroom Orchestra - Don't Ask Me Why - Waltz - In A Shady Nook - Quickstep

gpuqd.fatcity.us